Does the French Bioethics Law create a 'moral exception' to the use of human cells for health? A legal and organizational issue

  • A. Mahalatchimy INSERM, UMRS 1027, et Université de Toulouse, Paul Sabatier - Toulouse III, Faculté de médecine PACTE Politique-Organisations, UMR 5194, Institut d’Etudes Politiques, Grenoble
  • E. Rial-Sebbag INSERM, UMRS 1027, et Université de Toulouse, Paul Sabatier - Toulouse III, Faculté de médecine, Plateforme Génétique et société
  • V. Tournay PACTE Politique-Organisations, UMR 5194, Institut d’Etudes Politiques, Grenoble
  • A. Faulkner Department of Political Economy, King's College London

Resumen

This article focuses on the legal and organisational regulation of human cells in the United Kingdom and France. French Bioethics Law regulates human cells for health according to European Union law where it is enforceable. But products unregulated by EU law and based on human cells are never considered as medicinal products, given the strict implementation of the principle of "nonpatrimonialité" of the human body and its elements. By comparison, in the UK such products can be qualified as medicinal products. Moreover, the setting up of the UK stem cell bank gives rise to the development of policies which expand the stem cell as a legal object. The paper discusses how these societies"™ ethical and legal commitments underlie organisational practices in order to analyse the relationship between the existence (or not) of a national stem cell bank and the broader regulation of human cells.
Publicado
2011-10-01